Bankrupt furniture company owes thousands in debt accused of cheating customers – WISN Milwaukee | Vette Leader

A popular Third Ward furniture restoration business is now bankrupt, evicted from its warehouse and accused of cheating people out of money and family heirlooms. Cream City Restoration was located on the corner of Water Street and Chicago Street in Milwaukee, but the storefront is now empty. The warehouse on North 38th Street in Milwaukee, still filled with hundreds of pieces of furniture, is also locked. WISN 12 received complaints from dozens of customers accusing the company of intentionally deceiving them for profit. “They said six to eight weeks,” said Kasey Leaf, who is waiting for two chairs she paid $2,500 for in November. “I feel like they’re playing a shell game and intentionally scamming people.” “We gave them my husband’s grandfather’s heirloom chair, which is a very specific chair from the ’50s,” said Angela Heron, who paid the company $1,300 and 10 waited months. She said that little work was done when the chair was delivered. “On the face of it, they seem like the perfect small business,” Heron said. “You had a beautiful store front, they really took the time to talk to you as you were visiting the shops. I wish I had done more research.” WISN 12 received three complaints filed with the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Commerce and Consumer Protection and hundreds of pages filed in Small Claims Court. “I feel stupid. I feel like everything is my fault because I believed this guy all along,” said Tei Venderford, who agreed to give his grandmother’s heirloom furniture in California to Cream City Restoration through a consignment agreement two years ago, but it did not receive any compensation. “He bought at least $6,000 worth of furniture,” Venderford said. “He sent me $1,200 bail. A few months later, he asked for the deposit to be returned. I returned the money to him in good faith, thinking he would send me the rest. I’ve never heard from him since.” WISN 12 sat down with Cream City Restoration owners Jason and Kelsey McGinnis in an exclusive interview Wednesday. “We’ve lost really key employees over the last two years with COVID-19,” Kelsey said. “It really hurt our business, we couldn’t get the projects out as quickly as possible.” “It started to pile up,” Jason said. “Some of these people say they’ve been trying to reach you for years, a year or two,” said WISN 12’s Caroline Reinwald. “We never did that on purpose, we’re sorry, we’re doing everything we can to make it up to you.” to do with everyone and liquidate our assets to take care of the people,” Jason said. The McGinnis said they received more than $14,000 in federal COVID-19 relief funds, but said it was barely enough to cover their rent on Water Street.”Why continue? When you’re that overwhelmed, you can’t handle what you already have,” Reinwald asked. “We really thought it was a viable option. You know.” , we thought we’d get out of this,” Jason said. Now bankrupt, they’re being evicted from the warehouse as well. The landlord of that warehouse said the McGinnis owed him $40,000 in rent and evicted them from the property. The McGinnis said, they would online threatened. “We’re just trying to provide for our family and make a difference in our community. Obviously we were overwhelmed. We didn’t do anything on purpose,” Kelsey said. However, customers who spoke to WISN 12 are not convinced they will receive compensation. “I saw their storefront on Water Street and I’m still upset that I didn’t read the reviews before contacting them,” said Maggie Kerr, who paid almost $1,200 to rework two chairs paid. She said no work was done and she never received a refund. “I was constantly emailing them for an update and there was always an excuse,” said Nina Chang, who paid $2,387 to have chairs reupholstered. “I wholeheartedly agreed with him when there was a doubt.” The McGinnis told WISN 12 that they never want to own another company again. If you are a Cream City Restoration customer and feel that you are owed furniture or money, email the company’s bankruptcy attorney, Richard Check, at court@richardacheck.com.

A popular Third Ward furniture restoration business is now bankrupt, evicted from its warehouse and accused of cheating people out of money and family heirlooms.

Cream City Restoration was located on the corner of Water Street and Chicago Street in Milwaukee, but the storefront is now empty.

The warehouse on North 38th Street in Milwaukee, still filled with hundreds of pieces of furniture, is also locked.

WISN 12 received complaints from dozens of customers accusing the company of intentionally deceiving them for profit.

“They said six to eight weeks,” said Kasey Leaf, who is waiting for two chairs she paid $2,500 for in November. “I feel like they’re playing a shell game and intentionally scamming people.”

“We gave them my husband’s grandfather’s heirloom chair, a very special chair from the ’50s,” said Angela Heron, who paid the company $1,300 and waited 10 months.

She said that little work was done when the chair was delivered.

“On the face of it, they seem like the perfect small business,” Heron said. “You had a beautiful store front, they really took the time to talk to you as you were visiting the shops. I wish I had done more research.”

WISN 12 received three complaints filed with the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Commerce and Consumer Protection and hundreds of pages filed in small claims court.

“I feel stupid. I feel like everything is my fault because I believed this guy all along,” said Tei Venderford, who agreed to give his grandmother’s heirloom furniture in California to Cream City Restoration through a consignment agreement two years ago, but it did not receive any compensation.

“He bought at least $6,000 worth of furniture,” Venderford said. “He sent me $1,200 bail. A few months later, he asked for the bail back. I returned the money to him in good faith, thinking he would send me the rest. Since then I have never heard from him again.”

WISN 12 sat down with Cream City Restoration owners Jason and Kelsey McGinnis for an exclusive interview on Wednesday.

“We’ve lost really key employees over the last two years with COVID-19,” Kelsey said. “It really hurt our business, we couldn’t get the projects out that quickly.”

“It started to pile up,” Jason said.

“Some of these people say they’ve been trying to reach you for years, a year or two,” said WISN 12’s Caroline Reinwald.

“We never did this on purpose, sorry, we’re doing everything we can to make amends with everyone and liquidate our assets to take care of the people,” Jason said.

The McGinnis said they received more than $14,000 in federal COVID-19 relief funds, but said it was barely enough to cover their rent on Water Street.

“Why continue? When you’re that overwhelmed, you can’t handle what you already have,” Reinwald asked.

“We really thought it was a viable option. You know, we thought we’d get out of this,” Jason said.

Now bankrupt, they are also evicted from the warehouse.

The landlord of this warehouse said the McGinnis owed him $40,000 in rent and evicted them from the property.

The McGinnis said they were being threatened online.

“We’re just trying to provide for our family and make a difference in our community. Obviously we were overwhelmed. We didn’t do anything on purpose,” Kelsey said.

However, customers who spoke to WISN 12 are not convinced they will receive compensation.

“I saw their storefront on Water Street and I’m still upset that I didn’t read the reviews before contacting them,” said Maggie Kerr, who paid almost $1,200 to rework two chairs paid.

She said no work was done and she never received a refund.

“I was constantly emailing them for an update and there was always an excuse,” said Nina Chang, who paid $2,387 to have chairs reupholstered. “When in doubt, I absolutely agreed with him.”

The McGinnis told WISN 12 that they never want to own another company again.

If you are a Cream City Restoration customer and feel that you are owed furniture or money, email the company’s bankruptcy attorney, Richard Check, at court@richardacheck.com.

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