Vulnerable Democrats dismiss claims of expanded IRS in Manchin bill, calling climate ‘biggest threat’ to US – Fox News | Vette Leader

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Vulnerable House Democrats downplay concerns about Internal Revenue Service (IRS) provisions in the Inflation Reduction Act and welcome the bill’s focus on climate reform.

The 2022 Anti-Inflation Act, introduced by Sen. Joe Manchin, DW.Va., and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, DN.Y., is scheduled for a vote in the House of Representatives Friday afternoon and includes massive climate spending and provisions to boost federal revenue through increased tax enforcement.

The bill provides nearly $80 billion that could expand the IRS by hiring tens of thousands of new agents, but most Democrats dispute or dismiss concerns it will lead to more scrutiny of individuals and small businesses.

Fox News Digital reached out to 20 of the most vulnerable House Democrats for comment, asking for their thoughts on the IRS provisions included in the bill. None of them answered the question.

VULNERABLE HOUSE DEMOCRATES WILL NOT SAY IF THEY PLAN TO VOTE MANCHIN INFLATION REDUCTION ACT

Sen. Joe Manchin, DW.Va., has pushed for speedy passage of the Inflation Reduction Act, despite voting against “Build Back Better.”
(Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images)

Rep. Susan Wild, D-Pa., claimed that expanding the IRS would not increase taxes for Americans earning less than $400,000 a year, but would instead “cause people to file their tax returns faster.” receive”. She shared an infographic calling it a “myth” that the IRS would increase audits on small businesses and individuals.

Rep. Dina Titus, D-Nev., tweeted that she believes the climate is the greatest threat America has ever faced: “If I vote tomorrow for the Inflation Reduction Bill, I will vote for it to take aggressive action against the greatest threat we have ever faced: climate change.”

Rep. Steven Horsford, D-Nev., also commented on the climate provisions in the new Democrat bill: “Not just them #InflationReductionAct Lower healthcare and energy bills, big strides are also being made to combat them #climatecrisis.”

In a separate post, Horsford dismissed claims that the new legislation would increase taxes on working-class Americans.

The Joint Committee on Taxation (JCT) reported that taxes for Americans would be raised in nearly all income categories as a result of the Inflation Reduction Act, including increases in taxes for those earning less than $400,000 a year.

Rep. Angie Craig, D-Minn., also claimed that the new law would not increase taxes for certain individuals: “FACT CHECK: No matter how hard @KistnerCongress tries to mislead Minnesotans, the Anti-Inflation Act will NOT increase taxes uplift the middle class.”

AMERICANS FEAR THAT IRS WILL USE INFLATION REDUCTION ACT FUNDING TO TEST THE AVERAGE AND LOWER INCOME TAXPAYER

Rep. Henry Cuellar, D-Texas, announced Thursday his plan to vote in favor of the legislation: “No bill is perfect. However, compromise, common sense and rising above party politics to make meaningful and balanced changes are our duty as legislators. I look forward to this bill and President Biden enacting the Inflation Mitigation Act.”

Rep. Elaine Luria, D-Va., tweeted, “The high cost of prescription drugs is affecting millions of Americans every day, and the Inflation Reduction Act will quickly bring down healthcare costs and put money in the pockets of working families.”

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, DN.Y., said the bill was to reduce inflation "one of the defining legislative achievements of the 21st century."

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, DN.Y., said the Inflation Reduction Act was “one of the defining legislative achievements of the 21st century.”
(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Progressive Senator Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., has criticized Democrats’ claims regarding the bill, although he ultimately voted in favor of the bill. He told CNN on Wednesday that the Anti-Inflation Act will not reduce prescription drug costs for four years. Sanders also claimed that the bill will have “minimal impact” on fighting inflation.

Republicans have been clear in their opposition to the bill, insisting that amid the tech recession it would raise taxes and target working-class Americans through more tax audits and IRS hires.

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If the bill goes to the House of Representatives, only five Democrats would have to oppose the legislation for it to fail, though Democrats expect a final passage on Friday.

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